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Thu, 12 Dec 2019

Northeast Today

Bodo Film ‘ Jwlwi-The Seed ’ gets Huge Response from Viewers

Bodo Film ‘ Jwlwi-The Seed ’ gets Huge Response from Viewers
November 20
12:21 2019

NET Bureau

A heavy rush of viewers can be seen in cinema halls daily in every show to watch Rajni Basumatary’s Jwlwi-The Seed, a Bodo feature film. The film has been screened at Gold Cinema Hall since November 15 and it is receiving a very good response from viewers. The film reflects the insurgency problem, excesses of security forces, insecurity among the rural masses and innocent people getting killed and tortured in the name of insurgency operations.

Minister Pramila Rani Brahma on Sunday praised Rajni Basumatary’s efforts and said the film would be a huge success. On that day, Kokrajhar Deputy Commissioner PP Mazumder and Superintendent of Police Rajen Singh also enjoyed the film with the public. Several guests were also invited to the show.

Interacting with media persons in Kokrajhar, the producer, scriptwriter and main lead of the film, Rajni Basumatary said insurgency was at its peak in the Northeast in the 90s. “I had moved out of my home town for my college education and hence I was spared of the experience of the horrific incidents which my own family went through. Arbitrary killings, torture, enforced disappearances, kidnapping, whether at the hands of state actors or the non-state actors, were widespread. My nephews got killed and one of my brothers disappeared and he has not returned home till today. My parents lived and died hoping their son would return home someday,” she said, adding that her film Jwlwi-The Seed was not a story of her family but the story of thousands of families in the region during the 90s. She also said the situation had somewhat improved now but she had not yet mustered the courage to look at this episode of history with tinted glasses.

Basumatary said the film was about a family which loses one of their members to gun violence. “Stories of people who are living a scarred life could have been heavy. Fortunately, my characters are humorous, empathetic, and dreamers. And some of them are musicians! So, if they are under the boots and barrels of the gun one day, they are forming a musical band the other day,” she said. She further said the film was shot and edited in a way that reflects the everyday life of rural India.

Source: The Sentinel

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