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Thu, 19 Jul 2018

Northeast Today

Nagaland Surge Ahead to Shun VIP Culture

Nagaland Surge Ahead to Shun VIP Culture
May 14
11:18 2018

April Edition

Following the footsteps of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the newly-elected Chief Minister of Nagaland Neiphiu Rio has decided to shun away the practice of VIP culture in the state. As promised in the election manifesto of National Democratic People’s Party (NDPP) led by Rio, the notification to ban the nameplates and designations on the vehicles comes on a day the new government took the oath. Northeast Today reports

New Beginning

March 8, 2018, marks a red-letter day in the history of Nagaland as after much struggle former Nagaland Chief Minister Neiphiu Rio, once again took oath as the Chief Minister for the fourth time. Rio had quit his Chief Ministerial berth for contesting Lok Sabha elections in 2014.

Immediately after coming to power the newly-elected state government under Rio’s leadership has taken a historic decision by deciding to end the existing VIP culture in the state.

In a report released by the Nagaland Home Commissioner Abhishek Singh, the new government has strictly instructed that no government official and functionaries are allowed to display anything except the vehicle registration number on the vehicles.

The notification further added that under the provision of the Motor Vehicle Act 1988 and Central Motor Vehicle Act 1989 nothing except the registration number of the vehicle should be displayed on the number plates of the vehicles. Violators would face action under Section 177 of the Motor Vehicle Act 1988.

However, according to the notification, the ministers and MLAs will be provided appropriate colour coded car stickers to facilitate their movement. Barring Governor, Chief Minister, Deputy Chief Minister, Speaker and Deputy Speaker the government has also banned the use of pilots and security escorts by government functionaries within Kohima and Dimapur.

CM Speaks

Post taking the decision, CM Neiphiu Rio while speaking to media said, “We had committed in our manifesto that we will remove the VIP culture from the state.”

Rio believes people are the masters thus assure the people of Nagaland that the new government will tirelessly work towards the achievement of the commitment given to the people in the manifesto.

Organisations Appreciate

Accepting the government’s decision, K Elu Ndang, Assembly Secretary of Naga Hoho while interacting with Northeast Today, said, “The present government’s decision to shun VIP culture in the state is very welcoming. The VIP culture in a way is a distress to the common public.”

He further added that towns of Nagaland such as Kohima or Dimapur are quite small in terms of the area where VIP cars cause lots of disturbance to common people.

“The decision will also cut down the unnecessary expenditure of the state,” he opined. `

Speaking in the same line, President of Naga Students Federation (NSF) Kesosul Christopher, said, “This is no doubt a very positive and welcoming step taken by the newly-elected government of the state. It is really an important and pro-people agenda which we anticipate to be a long-term policy rather than a short-term policy.”

Local Reacts

Angela Angami, a student of Pranabananda Women’s College said, “I wholeheartedly support the people friendly decision of the newly elected government of the state, as I believe the VIP culture is a subconscious barrier between the common and influential people of the society.”

The Way forward

This people-friendly decision will definitely set a benchmark and will be seen as a trendsetter for other North-eastern and Indian states. We hope a day will soon come when VIP culture will be abolished.

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