Wanna get our awesome news?
We will send you weekly news & updates. Isn't that cool?
Subscribe!

Actually we will not spam you and keep your personal data secure

Wanna get our awesome news?
We will send you emails only several times per week. Isn't that cool?
Subscribe!

Actually we will not spam you and keep your personal data secure

Sun, 19 May 2019

Northeast Today

Shortage of Insulin to Affect Half of Type 2 Diabetics by 2030

Shortage of Insulin to Affect Half of Type 2 Diabetics by 2030
November 21
16:13 2018

NET Bureau

Diabetes affects more than 382 million people worldwide. The figures in India are scarier, with 1 in 20 people having diabetes and 1 in 15 on the verge of getting it.

A study, published in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, is a serious warning for the treatment of people suffering from type 2 diabetes in the coming years. By measuring the expected increase in insulin demand by 2030 and the incidence of type 2 diabetes, it signaled grave dearth of insulin to treat the patients. The data was collected from across 221 countries and sourced from the International Diabetes Federation.

Going by the numbers, 79 million people with type 2 diabetes will need insulin in the coming 12 years, while the insulin required to treat type 2 diabetes is expected to increase by around 20%. Almost half of the 79 million people will not get insulin if no significant improvements are made in the drug production.

The Guardian quoted Dr Sanjay Basu from Stanford University in the US, who led the research, as saying the current levels of insulin access are inadequate specially in Africa and Asia, requiring more efforts to overcome this shortage.

Dr Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, USDespite the UN’s commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily difficult for patients to access. The number of adults with type 2 diabetes is expected to rise over the next 12 years due to ageing, urbanisation, and associated changes in diet and physical activity. Unless governments begin initiatives to make insulin available and affordable, then its use is always going to be far from optimal.

In cases of type 2 diabetes, the body produces insulin but can’t process it properly. The early warning signs are hard to spot and people might ignore them.

Source: Dailyhunt

Share

Related Articles

0 Comments